How to Handle Accumelation (2019)

These 3 sculptures where made for the group exhibition Babylon at Marie Kirkegaard Gallery. The sculptures where presented toghether with the graphical works Slowly changing Dimensions (2016) and 400 (2019). 

Exhibition show ran from May 24 – June 29, 2019 and included works by Shinya Ishida, John Knuth, Mette Vangsgaard and Anna Bak. 

From press release:

The exhibition Babylon pursues the fundamentally contradictory relations inherited in the metropolises of today. We at the gallery love our metropolises all over the world. We are fascinated of their beauty as well as ugliness, and of the human relations that goes with it. It is here in the cities we get to enjoy and experience the major current issues in a very real and interesting way; like air pollution, water shortages, sustainability, immigration, cultural differences, human vanity, arrogance and debauchery, etc.

The four artists; Shinya Ishida, John Knuth, Mette Vangsgaard and Anna Bak, are from different cities in the world, and each in their respective ways, they show us how human relations and the city, that nurtured and inspired them, is woven into the very thought processes of their work. The developing socio-undercurrents we experience in the city produce mesmerizing and somewhat disturbing beautiful results in their respective artistic universes.

Anna Bak is interested in stories that are based on the classical conflict between nature and culture as well as socio-cultural paradoxes, in particular post-industrial melancholy associated with the loss of harmony with nature or ‘original culture’. For Babylon she has produced a new line of sculptures that use the negative forms from packing protection. By filling the empty space, that was meant to hold a valuable and fragile item, with solid materials like plaster and wax, she comments on consumerism and aesthetic value vs. the capitalistic value.

The artworks are available for sale through Marie Kirkegaard Gallery.